Reasons for Every Business to Have a Server to Increase Efficiency

Whether it’s dealing with customers, technical issues, or other employees, it’s important for everyone involved in a small business to know where they can find the resources they need to get the job done. Investing time and energy into any task that takes away from focusing on the core business simply cannot be tolerated in a successful small business. Every month small businesses devote countless hours to tasks that drain their precious resources. Time can’t be wasted searching for the right file or form or updating PC software, for example.

Investing in a server and creating a server-based network for the small business creates a number of efficiencies. A server changes the way that small businesses handle information by making small businesses more efficient in the way they communicate with partners and employees, collaborate on projects, and secure the information that is vital to the business.

Here are five ways that buying that first server for the small business will increase efficiency and allow employees to concentrate on the core business.

1. Easier Access to Information

Once a small business grows beyond more than one person or PC, the files and data that the business depends on can become more difficult to track. Peer-to-peer networks, which are popular among small businesses without a server, only work when all of the PCs are available and connected to the network. USB drives and Web-based e-mail are popular ways to transport and store data, but they present security risks and aren’t an efficient way to find and share files.

A server provides a centralized, secure repository for all of the important files that make small businesses go. Administrators can create, edit, and delete registered users of server-based networks to help control which users have access to the information. Applications that live on servers, and the information they contain, are available to users with accounts for those applications.

Using secure remote access technologies like virtual private networks allows employees to access information from laptops when they aren’t physically in the office. The ability to remotely connect to a server-based network means even a small business with one employee can benefit from using a server if they spend a lot of time on the road, visiting clients, or working from job sites. Gaining access to e-mail and information from mobile devices like a BlackBerry or Windows Phone requires a server to manage users and security. Small business employees need to quickly and easily locate the information they need regardless of their location. Introducing a server-based network keeps information organized and accessible to those who need it with more reliability and security than peer-to-peer networks and ad hoc methods of storing information.

2. Gain Control of E-Mail

Having a server allows small businesses to create, use, and control e-mail addresses on their own domain, which gives even the smallest of businesses a more professional image than using a free e-mail service like Yahoo! or Hotmail. Small businesses can turn to a hosting provider to get e-mail using their domain name, but like any outsourcing relationship, that means giving up some amount of control.

Buying a server and hosting e-mail lets small businesses control the creation of e-mail addresses, aliases, and distribution lists. This level of control makes it easier for e-mail to grow with the company. Even more important than the e-mail addresses is the e-mail data. Businesses of all sizes rely on e-mail for communication with employees, customers, partners, and suppliers. Maintaining control over all of those communications is not only convenient, but it has legal implications as well.

Protecting Your Business Structure As a Separate Entity

There are a wide variety of business entities to choose from and they vary from state to state. Which type of entity you choose will have a significant impact on your exposure to liability, your responsibilities as the business owner, and the taxes you and the business will be responsible for paying. Each type of structure has advantages and disadvantages, and should be chosen with care after consulting a business or legal professional.

Regardless of business structure, one of the most common mistakes business owners make is to believe that the entity they choose will provide unlimited legal protection. Yes, many of the business structures offer legal protection in the abstract, a sort of legal shield, so to speak. However, reality can be quite different. Your legal protection is dependent on whether you honor the structure. Simply filing the requisite documents establishing the business is insufficient to truly protect the business owner. The business owner also must operate the business as a distinct entity from him- or herself.

To start with, a basic rule of business ownership is the rule against the co-mingling of personal and business funds. It is vitally important for the business owner to keep his or her personal funds separate from the business accounts. This sounds so simple and, yet, many entrepreneurs co-mingle funds, rendering legal protection meaningless in the extreme. There is a legal doctrine called “piercing the corporate veil,” which allows a litigant to actually pierce the business structure of the entity being sued, and make a claim against the individual owner and his or her personal assets. This doctrine is only applied in the extreme, but it is an important doctrine to use as a litmus test when operating a business. One of the biggest factors a court will consider when deciding whether to “pierce the veil” is whether or not the business owner has co-mingled his or her personal and business funds. Rule of thumb: Keep them separate!

Another common mistake made by business owners is the failure to adhere to the legal formalities required of whatever type of business entity they chose. If you do not treat the business as a separate entity, then a court may not do so either. Alas, the protection you thought you had been entitled to may no longer exist! One of the easiest ways to treat the business as separate is to maintain great business records. If you are required to keep minutes or show proof of an annual meeting for your corporation, do so. If you are required to maintain proof of business expenses, make sure you have those documents and can find them (a good professional organizer can work wonders here!). In other words, create the paper trail required by law. That paper trail serves as strong evidence that the business is, indeed, a real business.

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Work From Home And Make Money With Your Own Online Business

Start Your Own Online Business- Top Reasons Why You Should
It isn’t easy to start an online business. Some people may lie to you and say it is the easiest thing they have ever done, but they are being at best unrealistic. Running an online business is as the name implies, “a business that is online”. So there are certain rules you must follow in order to earn cash online (and do it the right way).

Even though there are challenges to running a business online there are benefits to it as well. In my view it is better to start a business online. Below I have listed some of the top reasons I believe this to be true.

The Traditional Way To Get Cash Is Becoming Outdated
There are a lot of people who have great ideas, but can never seem to the get them off of the ground. Many times this is due to lack of resources or the ability to properly fund their business. With the traditional business model there is normally a substantial investment. An internet business does not require this major investment (though there could be a small one).

Using the example of a brick and mortar store an owner must invest in their business only to have their money at times locked in the business itself for years. Many times it takes years for the store owner to recuperate their entire investment. With an online business model you would have less overhead and other means to store your inventory (such as drop shipping or as an affiliate). This means that inventory is not a requirement allowing you to ship product upon demand versus investing in the goods upfront.

Each Industry Dictates It’s Threshold To Make Money
Certain industries require you to invest money to make money. Depending upon the industry itself starting small may be out of the question. The reason? In order to compete you must be competitive. To be competitive in the traditional sense may require a significant investment of funds from the beginning. This is not even mentioning physical location(s), staff and security issues.

However, a home based business that exists on the internet can grow as you grow. We all want to grow. With a smaller investment you can leverage your advantage for greater profits. If staff is required, the positions are minimal and physical security becomes one less thing for you to worry about (especially if you are an affiliate or you don’t house your products in-house).

The Internet Is Becoming The Standard For Communicating A Business
The day is coming where if you’re not online you don’t exist. Even traditional brick and mortar organizations are now vying for a presence on the web.